The Meditation Source Room: Two 3D plastic prints of tumors (printed at NYU’s AMS), mounted as sconces, with led lights inserted in the wall. The sound is a mix of an MRI machine (with the technician occasionally asking ‘are you doing ok?’) and a shamanic visualization / extraction session - which have eerily similar aural qualities. There are three ways of ‘seeing inside’ that are gathered in this room: the MRI, the shamanic and the viewer’s own meditation.

The Meditation Source Room: Two 3D plastic prints of tumors (printed at NYU’s AMS), mounted as sconces, with led lights inserted in the wall. The sound is a mix of an MRI machine (with the technician occasionally asking ‘are you doing ok?’) and a shamanic visualization / extraction session - which have eerily similar aural qualities. There are three ways of ‘seeing inside’ that are gathered in this room: the MRI, the shamanic and the viewer’s own meditation.

Extractions
Bronze Sculpture

Extractions

Bronze Sculpture

Extractions
Bronze sculpture

Extractions

Bronze sculpture

Ruins (Carcinomas) - 2011 - Installation at Eyebeam Window Gallery
Depicting fallen urban landscapes over-run with tumors, these sculptures highlight breast cancer’s links to carcinogens in our everyday environment. The grey ‘support material’ used by 3D printers to build up a form is generally meant to be removed. But we used Eyebeam’s 3D printer in such a way as to maximize the architectural form of the printer’s support structures and then hacked at the structures to partially reveal the white tumor embedded.

Ruins (Carcinomas) - 2011 - Installation at Eyebeam Window Gallery

Depicting fallen urban landscapes over-run with tumors, these sculptures highlight breast cancer’s links to carcinogens in our everyday environment. The grey ‘support material’ used by 3D printers to build up a form is generally meant to be removed. But we used Eyebeam’s 3D printer in such a way as to maximize the architectural form of the printer’s support structures and then hacked at the structures to partially reveal the white tumor embedded.

Casting a tumor sculpture at the Modern Art Foundry, Queens, NY

OBC interview on The Stupid Cancer Show

The Stupid Cancer show is multi-award-winning international talk radio webcast hosted by Lisa Bernhard – former Entertainment Correspondent for FOX News and former Deputy Editor of TV Guide – and i[2]y Founder/CEO Matthew Zachary.

Investment at the Modern Art Foundry, Queens, NY

Pink Fatigue Summary

This year was definitely the year of Pink Fatigue. From the activist organizations and academics that had been working on this issue for years, it finally seeped into major mainstream media. Some examples:

Marie Claire The Big Business of Breast Cancer 

The Huffington Post on Why I Took a Pass on Pink

The New York Times on the Pinking of America

NPR on Pink Fatigue

Ms Magazine’s The Problem With Pink 

Better Business Bureau’s blog on Think Before You Give

Extractions
Bronze sculpture

Extractions

Bronze sculpture

The Chances of This Happening

Performance on opening night of Extractions show at Ramis Barquet. (Video credit: Paula de la Cruz)

A pair of 14-year-old identical twin girls positioned themselves in different parts of the gallery. They were not seen together until the last phase of the performance. In a show about mortality, they embodied double the life - whilst also echoing the themes of replication that traverse the rest of the exhibition. 

Each twin took turns sitting at a table in the middle of the main room tracing out a stencil that revealed the words ‘Life’, ‘Time’, ‘Risk’. Though these terms resonate strongly for cancer survivors, they are medically applied to everyone in order to assess the probability of any given person developing a disease: it is said,‘Your Lifetime Risk of developing disease X by age Y is Z%’. But taken on their own, each of the terms reflects important themes in every one’s life, cancer survivors as well as ‘non-cancer survivors’. Being alive (life) also means being subject to the passage of time and facing a wide range of risks, genetic as well as social.

An hour glass on the table kept time, but never ran out as each twin turned it around before the sand poured out. The sheets with ‘Life Time Risk’ imprints were handed out to the audience. Additionally, the twins, who are enrolled in high school Latin, only spoke in Latin, uttering, intoning or responding with phrases such as “Time flies”, “Time is slow” and “Latin is a dead language”. This dead language took the idea of life-cycles beyond individual humans onto the civilizational stage.

Identical Twin Performers: Francesca and Gaela LaPasta